Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Tests Reveal How Much Wood Is In Our Cheese! + New Video

A few years ago now, I filmed a video about this food additive that has now been shown to cause digestive issues, bloating, and intestinal inflammation. It can destroy gut bacteria and lead to weight gain.

Now we know how much of this additive is in our cheese!

Bloomberg News tested several brands of Parmesan shredded cheese to find out how much cellulose (a by-product of the wood industry) is in some popular brands.

They found:

  • Essential Everyday 100% Grated Parmesan Cheese, from Jewel-Osco, was 8.8 percent cellulose.
  • Wal-Mart Stores Inc.'s Great Value 100% Grated Parmesan Cheese registered 7.8 percent, according to test results.
  • Whole Foods 365 brand didn't list cellulose as an ingredient on the label, but still tested at 0.3 percent. (Probably contamination from another cheese brand that uses cellulose produced on the same factory equipment)
  • Kraft had 3.8 percent.

It is shocking that shredded cheese can have this much wood pulp in it! This is insane, right?

I am so glad that this information is getting out to the public in a big way – several major media outlets are reporting this news too. It is absolutely critical for you to avoid this substance if you want to feel your best – shred your own cheese!

I never understood why eating pizza at popular pizza fast food chains made me feel so awful. Thankfully, now I do.

If you love this kind of cutting edge health information, please come over and watch the new trailer on the Food Babe YouTube channel and subscribe. I have many more fun, educational and entertaining videos coming this week – the food industry won't want you to see what I have up my sleeve!

Watch the new trailer here.

I am so excited to be part of this healthy food movement with you.

Keep spreading the word!

Xo,

Vani

P.S. Don't forget to subscribe to the Food Babe YouTube Channel. I need you there with me friend!

 

 

 

 

 



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